3.0 How to manage information in partnership with health professionals

October 9, 2007 0 Comments

You may want to ask your doctor about a piece of medical research you have found or request a particular therapy or drug you have seen on the Internet. Please think carefully about how you do this. Doctors are very busy and the consultation is very short. Make the best use of this short consultation …

Judge: web sites for health

October 9, 2007 0 Comments

Careful use of fonts, colours and graphics is very important, particularly to make your site accessible to people with visual problems. The Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) has a Web access centre (http://www.rnib.org.uk/xpedio/groups/public/documents/code/public_rnib008789.hcsp) [Opens in new browser window]. Use fonts (size and colour) that can be easily read, and / or changed by …

Judge: web sites for health

October 9, 2007 0 Comments

Select a Web site address (a domain name) for your site that is simple and meaningful. The URL (uniform resource locator) is the standard way of specifying the location of a Web page, its Web address. The ‘domain name’ of a Web site is the first part of the Web address. between http:// and the …

Judge: web sites for health

October 9, 2007 0 Comments

Good site design is encouraging, but it should not be used as the only or main reason for judging the quality of a site. Design covers the following issues. Privacy The Data Protection Act covers the use of personal data, which is anything that could identify a living person. Any organisation collecting personal data through …

Judge: web sites for health

October 9, 2007 0 Comments

The aim is to make your site easily accessible to all, and to reduce any barriers to its use by: people with disabilities, such as sight, hearing, or physical problems, learning difficulties; older people, with sight, hearing, physical or cognitive problems; inexperienced Internet users; people using different types of technology; people using older technology; non-English …

Judge: web sites for health

October 9, 2007 0 Comments

Another way of improving the chances of a search engine finding your site in response to a person’s search is to submit (register) your site with a range of search engines, directories (collections of Internet sites grouped by subject) or gateways (free searchable catalogues of health Internet sites). Look for menu items like ‘Submit your …

Judge: web sites for health

October 9, 2007 0 Comments

To improve the chances of a search engine finding your site in response to a person’s search, you need to include appropriate keywords. Place important keywords in the text at the top of your pages. When writing your content always bear in mind the need for these keywords. Include keywords and other descriptive information in …

Judge: web sites for health

October 9, 2007 0 Comments

Methods to make contact with the organisation should be available, for example, an e-mail address, a postal address, a phone number, electronic forms. Look for any limits placed on this communication. Are phone helplines only staffed for fixed time periods? (a) Can you leave messages on an answerphone? (b) Will you receive a reply? (c) …

Judge: web sites for health

October 9, 2007 0 Comments

Put your Web address (and e-mail address if you want public contact through that route) on all your publications and products, including: (a) letterheads, business cards, compliment slips; (b) newsletters, leaflets; (c) anything written by or about you, such as articles, adverts; (d) automatic e-mail ‘signatures’. However include the ‘signature’ as simple text within the …

Judge: web sites for health

September 23, 2007 0 Comments

If you want to build your confidence in using the Internet look for taster sessions or short courses at local organisations like public libraries, the WEA (Workers’ Educational Association), further education colleges or universities. However there may be a small fee for courses. Public libraries provide free access to the Internet. The following sites provide …